On July 22nd the Whose Heritage Matters team took part in an online seminar, organised as part of an AHRC Global Challenges workshop, University College London. The team were part of a panel on the effective utilisation of sustainability and heritage research and asked 'effective for whom and how?'

As part of our commitment to co-production, Jam and Justice Action Research Collective members had access to a personal knowledge exchange and impact budget to support institutional and sectoral learning and take findings back into different worlds of work and life. 

As part of our commitment to co-production, Jam and Justice Action Research Collective members had access to a personal knowledge exchange and impact budget to support institutional and sectoral learning and take findings back into different worlds of work and life. 

As part of our commitment to co-production, Jam and Justice ARC members had access to a personal knowledge exchange and impact budget to support institutional and sectoral learning and take findings back into different worlds of work and life. 

As part of our commitment to co-production, Jam and Justice Action Research Collective members had access to a personal knowledge exchange and impact budget to support institutional and sectoral learning and take findings back into different worlds of work and life. 

Between 13–18 October 2019, the Realising Just Cities team at the Urban Institute coordinated a succession of events as hosts of the 4th Mistra Urban Futures conference. Why did we meet and what did we achieve? Realising Just Cities UK impact officer Iona Hine reports:

Our second guest post by Rene Meijer, Action Research Team member of SAFE, a project aiming to convene spaces for exchanging knowledge and amplifying work towards more urban food systems.

By Richard Goulding, 30th October 2019

Central Manchester’s apartment boom has become a matter of running controversy in recent years. The city’s political leaders and development industry argue this has brought renewed growth after 20th Century decline brought on by deindustrialisation. Critics point to disconnect between cranes on the skyline and a crisis of street and ‘hidden’ homelessness, asking who benefits from the city’s regeneration.